Design San Francisco 2014 – Suzanne Tucker and Singing the Blues

On a not-so-blue-skies day last week I popped into Design San Francisco to catch Suzanne Tucker’s gracious presentation about her design practice illustrated with projects from her new book “The Romance of Design”. (Read more of what Tucker had to say in my BANG profile this weekend.) After she’d  finished, I took a closer look at the furnishings on the San Francisco Design Center stage and thought that though Pantone has declared Radiant Orchid the color of the year, I continue to see a sea of blue textiles and accessories.

Like these lovely cornflower blue fabrics from Tucker’s home line made into bed linens.

Some nautical navy sewn into cushions and pillows.

Watery turquoise resin molded into tabletops.

Bold graphic periwinkle rugs.

Slate-blue wall coverings.

And ethereal aqua art.

Maybe purple will eventually reign, but for now blue rules.

 

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Kathryn Pritchett

writes about Things Elemental — where we find shelter, why we connect, what sustains us and how we strut our stuff.

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    • More Flower Show shots of people, plants and garden-themed paraphernalia including beautiful batik-printed scarves by textile artist Jane Hickman (scroll through to see a shot of us both wearing her wares). The rose covered folly is by the same company that created my friend Pauline's brick folly in her Oakland urban garden. Ended the day with an Evensong service at Westminster Abbey which is about a block away from where we're staying. Had a hard time keeping my eyes open through the Palestrina number but my choir director sister-in-law Diane says that Palestrina intended to write music that would float you away on a choral cloud. Mission accomplished.